The Potential Role of Dietary Xanthophylls in Cataract and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

@article{Moeller2000ThePR,
  title={The Potential Role of Dietary Xanthophylls in Cataract and Age-Related Macular Degeneration},
  author={Suzen M. Moeller and Paul F. Jacques and Jeffrey B. Blumberg},
  journal={Journal of the American College of Nutrition},
  year={2000},
  volume={19},
  pages={522S - 527S}
}
The carotenoid xanthophylls, lutein and zeaxanthin, accumulate in the eye lens and macular region of the retina. Lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations in the macula are greater than those found in plasma and other tissues. A relationship between macular pigment optical density, a marker of lutein and zeaxanthin concentration in the macula, and lens optical density, an antecedent of cataractous changes, has been suggested. The xanthophylls may act to protect the eye from ultraviolet phototoxicity… 
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TLDR
Although increasing the intake of lutein or zeaxanthin might prove to be protective against the development of age-related macular degeneration, a causative relationship has yet to be experimentally demonstrated.
The role of the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, in protecting against age-related macular degeneration: A review based on controversial evidence
TLDR
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The effect of Ocuvite supplementation on the density of macular lutein and zeaxanthin
TLDR
Lutein did not significantly increase macular pigment density levels over a six-month period in the experimental group versus the control group, and Ocuvite (Bausch & Lomb) supplementation was proposed, which is a preparation of lutein plus other antioxidant molecules.
Dietary Sources of Lutein and Zeaxanthin Carotenoids and Their Role in Eye Health
TLDR
Recent scientific evidences supporting the benefits of lutein and zexanthin in preventing the onset of two major age-related eye diseases with diets rich in these carotenoids are reviewed.
The science behind lutein.
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  • Medicine
    Alternative medicine review : a journal of clinical therapeutic
  • 2001
TLDR
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Can Xanthophyll-Membrane Interactions Explain Their Selective Presence in the Retina and Brain?
TLDR
It is hypothesized that the high membrane solubility and preferential transmembrane orientation of macular xanthophylls distinguish them from other dietary carotenoids, enhance their chemical and physical stability in retina and brain membranes and maximize their protective action in these organs.
Lutein and Zeaxanthin—Food Sources, Bioavailability and Dietary Variety in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Protection
TLDR
Diet models outlined provide information about the importance of diet variety among people at high risk of AMD or with early signs and symptoms of AMD, and describe important food sources and factors that increase the bioavailability of L/Z, to inform dietary models.
Consumption dietary sources of lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin among young adults living in megapolis
TLDR
Raw red tomatoes and eggs are the main sources of carotenoids for the majority of respondents regardless of age and season, and Foods with high levels of lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin are absent or only occasionally included in the diet.
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