The Polyvagal Theory: phylogenetic contributions to social behavior

@article{Porges2003ThePT,
  title={The Polyvagal Theory: phylogenetic contributions to social behavior},
  author={S. Porges},
  journal={Physiology \& Behavior},
  year={2003},
  volume={79},
  pages={503-513}
}
  • S. Porges
  • Published 2003
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Physiology & Behavior
The scientific legacy of Paul MacLean provides important insights into the neural substrate of adaptive social behavior in mammals. Through his research and visionary conceptualizations, current investigators can legitimately study social behavior from a neurobiological perspective. His research and writings provided three important contributions. First, he emphasized the importance of evolution as an organizing principle that shaped both the structure of the nervous system and the adaptive… Expand
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