The Political Development of Job Discrimination Litigation, 1963–1976

@article{Farhang2009ThePD,
  title={The Political Development of Job Discrimination Litigation, 1963–1976},
  author={Sean Farhang},
  journal={Studies in American Political Development},
  year={2009},
  volume={23},
  pages={23 - 60}
}
  • Sean Farhang
  • Published 1 October 2008
  • History, Law
  • Studies in American Political Development
In lobbying for the job discrimination provisions of the Civil Rights Act (CRA) of 1964, liberal civil rights advocates wanted an administrative job discrimination enforcement regime modeled on the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), with no private lawsuits. Pivotal conservative Republicans, empowered by a divided Democratic Party and the filibuster in the Senate, defeated an administrative framework and provided instead for private lawsuits with incentives for enforcement, including… 
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