The Place of the Hidden Moon: Erotic Mysticism in the Vaiṣṇava-Sahajiyā Cult of Bengal@@@The Place of the Hidden Moon: Erotic Mysticism in the Vaisnava-Sahajiya Cult of Bengal

@article{Hopkins1970ThePO,
  title={The Place of the Hidden Moon: Erotic Mysticism in the Vaiṣṇava-Sahajiyā Cult of Bengal@@@The Place of the Hidden Moon: Erotic Mysticism in the Vaisnava-Sahajiya Cult of Bengal},
  author={Thomas J. Hopkins and Edward C. Dimock,},
  journal={Journal of the American Oriental Society},
  year={1970},
  volume={90},
  pages={351}
}
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