The Physiology of Willpower: Linking Blood Glucose to Self-Control

@article{Gailliot2007ThePO,
  title={The Physiology of Willpower: Linking Blood Glucose to Self-Control},
  author={Matthew Thomas Gailliot and Roy F. Baumeister},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Review},
  year={2007},
  volume={11},
  pages={303 - 327}
}
Past research indicates that self-control relies on some sort of limited energy source. This review suggests that blood glucose is one important part of the energy source of self-control. Acts of self-control deplete relatively large amounts of glucose. Self-control failures are more likely when glucose is low or cannot be mobilized effectively to the brain (i.e., when insulin is low or insensitive). Restoring glucose to a sufficient level typically improves self-control. Numerous self-control… Expand
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