The Physiological Ecology of Mycoheterotrophy

@inproceedings{Hynson2013ThePE,
  title={The Physiological Ecology of Mycoheterotrophy},
  author={Nicole A. Hynson and Thomas Madsen and Marc-Andr{\'e} Selosse and Iris K. U. Adam and Yuki Ogura-Tsujita and M{\'e}lanie Roy and Gerhard Gebauer},
  year={2013}
}
The purpose of this chapter is to provide a practical and theoretical framework for the study of the ecophysiology of mycoheterotrophic plants. We accomplish this by providing a comparative overview of our current knowledge on carbon and nitrogen isotope natural abundance in partially and fully mycoheterotrophic plants associated with ectomycorrhizal, wood- and litter-decomposer saprotrophic, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and discuss their ecophysiological implications. We present a meta… Expand

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