The Physical Destruction of Nauru: An Example of Weak Sustainability

@inproceedings{Gowdy1999ThePD,
  title={The Physical Destruction of Nauru: An Example of Weak Sustainability},
  author={John M. Gowdy and Carl N. McDaniel},
  year={1999}
}
sanctity of individual choice, the fungibility of economic goods and inputs, and faith in the market system to bring forth substitutes as relative prices change. These notions are part of what Joseph Schumpeter called the "pre-analytic vision" of neoclassical economics (Daly 1995) and they are central to the concept of weak sustainability, a topic of intense debate among ecological economists (Cabeza Gutes 1996; Gowdy 1997; Gowdy and O'Hara 1997; Martinez-Alier 1995; Pearce and Atkinson 1993… 
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