The Phylogenetic Mixed Model

@article{Housworth2004ThePM,
  title={The Phylogenetic Mixed Model},
  author={Elizabeth A. Housworth and Em{\'i}lia P. Martins and Michael Lynch},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2004},
  volume={163},
  pages={84 - 96}
}
The phylogenetic mixed model is an application of the quantitative‐genetic mixed model to interspecific data. Although this statistical framework provides a potentially unifying approach to quantitative‐genetic and phylogenetic analysis, the model has been applied infrequently because of technical difficulties with parameter estimation. We recommend a reparameterization of the model that eliminates some of these difficulties, and we develop a new estimation algorithm for both the original… Expand

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