The Personification of the Business Corporation in American Law, 54 U. Chi. L. Rev. 1441 (1987)

@inproceedings{Mark1987ThePO,
  title={The Personification of the Business Corporation in American Law, 54 U. Chi. L. Rev. 1441 (1987)},
  author={Gregory A. Mark},
  year={1987}
}
The personification of the corporation was once of central concern to American jurisprudence. Diverse political and economic views, phrased in the language of legal discourse, were essential to discussions of the corporation's design, form, function, and operation. After the Second World War, however, the place of the corporation in law had ceased to be controversial, and both theoreticians and practitioners concerned themselves instead with organizational theory and economic analysis of… 
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