The Pergamon phenomenon 1951–1991: Robert Maxwell and scientific publishing

@article{Cox2002ThePP,
  title={The Pergamon phenomenon 1951–1991: Robert Maxwell and scientific publishing},
  author={Brian Cox},
  journal={Learned Publishing},
  year={2002},
  volume={15}
}
  • Brian Cox
  • Published 1 October 2002
  • Art
  • Learned Publishing
The author retired from Elsevier Science in 1998. His first employer in the book trade was Sir Basil Blackwell. He later worked for 31 years for Robert Maxwell at Headington Hill Hall, initially as subscription manager, and finally as a director of Pergamon Journals and Pergamon Press. In this memoir, he describes his personal experience of Maxwell, the man, and of Pergamon Press, the company he founded and ran. 

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