The Peopling of the New World: Perspectives from Molecular Anthropology

@article{Schurr2004ThePO,
  title={The Peopling of the New World: Perspectives from Molecular Anthropology},
  author={Theodore G. Schurr},
  journal={Annual Review of Anthropology},
  year={2004},
  volume={33},
  pages={551-583}
}
  • T. Schurr
  • Published 15 September 2004
  • Geography
  • Annual Review of Anthropology
▪ Abstract A number of important insights into the peopling of the New World have been gained through molecular genetic studies of Siberian and Native American populations. These data indicate that the initial migration of ancestral Amerindian originated in south-central Siberia and entered the New World between 20,000–14,000 calendar years before present (cal yr BP). These early immigrants probably followed a coastal route into the New World, where they expanded into all continental regions. A… 

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