The Peopling of Modern Bosnia‐Herzegovina: Y‐chromosome Haplogroups in the Three Main Ethnic Groups

@article{Marjanovic2005ThePO,
  title={The Peopling of Modern Bosnia‐Herzegovina: Y‐chromosome Haplogroups in the Three Main Ethnic Groups},
  author={D. Marjanovic and S. Fornarino and S. Montagna and D. Primorac and R. Had{\vz}iselimovi{\'c} and S. Vidovi{\'c} and N. Pojskic and V. Battaglia and A. Achilli and K. Drobni{\vc} and {\vS}. Andjelinovi{\'c} and A. Torroni and A. S. Santachiara‐Benerecetti and O. Semino},
  journal={Annals of Human Genetics},
  year={2005},
  volume={69}
}
Key MethodThe variation at 28 Y-chromosome biallelic markers was analysed in 256 males (90 Croats, 81 Serbs and 85 Bosniacs) from Bosnia-Herzegovina. An important shared feature between the three ethnic groups is the high frequency of the "Palaeolithic" European-specific haplogroup (Hg) I, a likely signature of a Balkan population re-expansion after the Last Glacial Maximum. This haplogroup is almost completely represented by the sub-haplogroup I-P37 whose frequency is, however, higher in the Croats…Expand
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