The Pedestal and the Veil: Rethinking the Capitalism/Slavery Question

@article{Johnson2004ThePA,
  title={The Pedestal and the Veil: Rethinking the Capitalism/Slavery Question},
  author={Walter Johnson},
  journal={Journal of the Early Republic},
  year={2004},
  volume={24},
  pages={299}
}
  • W. Johnson
  • Published 1 July 2004
  • History, Economics
  • Journal of the Early Republic
What does it mean to speak of the "commodification of people" as a domain of historical inquiry? Why put it that way? What does it mean to say that a person has been commodified? Is this about slavery? Prostitution? Wage labor? The sale of donated organs, fetal tissue samples, and sections of the human genome? Is it about the way that my personal data is sold without me knowing anything about it? Is it about the Coke machine in my kid's school cafeteria-the sale of her unwitting little field of… 
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This acclaimed history of Portuguese and Brazilian slaving in the southern Atlantic is now available in paperback. With extraordinary skill, Joseph C. Miller explores the complex relationships among
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  • 1978
White for their helpful comments on this essay
  • Journal of the Early Republic,
  • 2004