The Path to Routine Genomic Screening in Health Care

@article{Murray2018ThePT,
  title={The Path to Routine Genomic Screening in Health Care},
  author={Michael F. Murray},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2018},
  volume={169},
  pages={407-408}
}
  • M. Murray
  • Published 31 July 2018
  • Medicine
  • Annals of Internal Medicine
For more than a generation, the idea that an individually tailored health care management plan could be designed on the basis of a person's genetic code has sparked many imaginations. In 1991, Dr. Walter Gilbert, a Nobel laureate who developed DNA sequencing methods, suggested that, By around 2020, the cost of sequencing will have dropped low enough to allow sequencing an individual's entire DNA. People will come back from a physical examination with their own DNA sequence on a compact disc or… 
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