The Paradoxical Brain: The paradox of human expertise: why experts get it wrong

@inproceedings{Dror2011ThePB,
  title={The Paradoxical Brain: The paradox of human expertise: why experts get it wrong},
  author={Itiel E. Dror},
  year={2011}
}
  • I. Dror
  • Published 1 July 2011
  • Psychology
Expertise is correctly, but one-sidedly, associated with special abilities and enhanced performance. The other side of expertise, however, is surreptitiously hidden. Along with expertise, performance may also be degraded, culminating in a lack of flexibility and error. Expertise is demystified by explaining the brain functions and cognitive architecture involved in being an expert. These information processing mechanisms, the very making of expertise, entail computational trade-offs that… Expand
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