The Pain of Being Borderline: Dysphoric States Specific to Borderline Personality Disorder

@article{Zanarini1998ThePO,
  title={The Pain of Being Borderline: Dysphoric States Specific to Borderline Personality Disorder},
  author={Mary C. Zanarini and Frances R. Frankenburg and Christine J. DeLuca and John Hennen and Gagan S. Khera and John G. Gunderson},
  journal={Harvard Review of Psychiatry},
  year={1998},
  volume={6},
  pages={201–207}
}
&NA; The objective of this study was to identify the dysphoric states that best characterize patients meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder and distinguish them from those in patients with other forms of personality disorder. One hundred forty‐six patients with criteria‐defined borderline personality disorder and 34 Axis II controls filled out the Dysphoric Affect Scale, a 50‐item self‐report measure that was designed for this purpose and has good internal consistency and test… 

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