The Pace of Shifting Climate in Marine and Terrestrial Ecosystems

@article{Burrows2011ThePO,
  title={The Pace of Shifting Climate in Marine and Terrestrial Ecosystems},
  author={Michael T. Burrows and David S. Schoeman and Lauren B. Buckley and Pippa J. Moore and elvira poloczanska and Keith Brander and Chris G. Brown and John F. Bruno and Carlos M. Duarte and Benjamin S. Halpern and Johnna M. Holding and Carrie V Kappel and Wolfgang Kiessling and Mary I. O’Connor and John M. Pandolfi and Camille Parmesan and Franklin B. Schwing and William J. Sydeman and Anthony J. Richardson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={334},
  pages={652 - 655}
}
Ecologically relevant measures of contemporary global climate change can predict species distributions and vulnerabilities. Climate change challenges organisms to adapt or move to track changes in environments in space and time. We used two measures of thermal shifts from analyses of global temperatures over the past 50 years to describe the pace of climate change that species should track: the velocity of climate change (geographic shifts of isotherms over time) and the shift in seasonal… 
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