The Oxford Handbook of Religious Conversion

@article{Jindra2015TheOH,
  title={The Oxford Handbook of Religious Conversion},
  author={Ines W. Jindra},
  journal={Sociology of Religion},
  year={2015},
  volume={76},
  pages={242-244}
}
  • I. Jindra
  • Published 1 June 2015
  • Philosophy
  • Sociology of Religion

Interpreting conversion in antiquity (and beyond)

Correspondence Andrew S. Jacobs, Center for the Study of World Religions, Harvard Divinity School, Cambridge, MA, USA. Email: andrew@andrewjacobs.org Abstract This essay explores the persistent

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“When your heart is touched, it’s not a decision”

This is a qualitative study of 17 Iranian Muslim converts to Christianity residing in Canada. The study asks how the sample narrativizes the meaning of religious conversion in their lives. Analysis

Revisioning Buddhism as a Science of the Mind in a Secularized China: A Tibetan Perspective

Tibetan Buddhism is one of the fastest growing religions among Chinese in the twenty-first century. The transnational teaching activities of numerous Tibetan lamas attest to this religious trend in

Conversion and the Real: The (Im)Possibility of Testimonial Representation

TLDR
This essay argues that through testimonial discourse converts construct social reality as an answer to the impossibility of ‘the real’ in their performative discursive practice.

Contesting Inter-Religious Conversion in the Medieval World

The right of Yaniv Fox and Yosi Yisraeli to be identified as the authors of the editorial material, and of the authors for their individual chapters, has been asserted in accordance with sections 77