The Oxford English Dictionary

@inproceedings{SimpsonTheOE,
  title={The Oxford English Dictionary},
  author={J. Simpson and E. Weiner}
}
The publication of the final volume of the OED Supplement marks the completion of a "work which will last longer and prove more influential than anything else published this half-century" (The Times of London). It is the final piece of a great jigsaw that provides the fullest possible treatment of the English language from the middle of the twelfth century to 1980s. Within the alphabetical range of Se to Z, this volume contains all the new words that have come into use during the twentieth… Expand
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References

1883) 120 And as to them that ben seke contynuell visitacion of them
  • 1548-9 (Mar.) Bk. Com. Prayer. Offices 18 TheOrder for the visitacion of the sicke. 1583 in Wodrow Soc. Misc.
  • 1844