The Origins of Plant Cultivation and Domestication in the New World Tropics

@article{Piperno2011TheOO,
  title={The Origins of Plant Cultivation and Domestication in the New World Tropics},
  author={Dolores R. Piperno},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2011},
  volume={52},
  pages={S453 - S470}
}
  • D. Piperno
  • Published 4 August 2011
  • Biology
  • Current Anthropology
The New World tropical forest is now considered to be an early and independent cradle of agriculture. As in other areas of the world, our understanding of this issue has been significantly advanced by a steady stream of archaeobotanical, paleoecological, and molecular/genetic data. Also importantly, a renewed focus on formulating testable theories and explanations for the transition from foraging to food production has led to applications from subdisciplines of ecology, economy, and evolution… 
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