The Organization of Male and Female Labor in Foraging Societies: Implications for Early Paleoindian Archaeology

@article{Waguespack2005TheOO,
  title={The Organization of Male and Female Labor in Foraging Societies: Implications for Early Paleoindian Archaeology},
  author={Nicole M. Waguespack},
  journal={American Anthropologist},
  year={2005},
  volume={107},
  pages={666-676}
}
  • N. Waguespack
  • Published 1 December 2005
  • Sociology
  • American Anthropologist
I use cross-cultural ethnographic data to explore the relationship between male and female subsistence labor among hunter-gatherer populations by examining data regarding resource procurement, time allocation, and task differentiation between the sexes relative to dependence on hunted foods. The findings indicate that female foragers generally perform a variety of nonsubsistence collection activities and preferentially procure high-return resources in hunting-based economies. I develop ideas… 

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