The Ohm Is Where the Art Is: British Telegraph Engineers and the Development of Electrical Standards

@article{Hunt1994TheOI,
  title={The Ohm Is Where the Art Is: British Telegraph Engineers and the Development of Electrical Standards},
  author={Bruce J. Hunt},
  journal={Osiris},
  year={1994},
  volume={9},
  pages={48 - 63}
}
T HE HUMBLE RESISTANCE BOX has been central to the daily work, and crucial to many of the most outstanding achievements, of both physicists and electrical engineers since the middle of the nineteenth century. Without the ready availability of accurate and reliable resistance standards, the precision electrical measurement that underlies so many areas of science and technology would be virtually impossible. As Fleeming Jenkin, himself a pioneer in the development of the standard ohm, observed in… 
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1:129, as quoted in Lynch
On the later history of electrical standards work at the Cavendish see Simon Schaffer
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