The Oceanography of the Celtic Sea I. Wind Drift

@article{Cooper1961TheOO,
  title={The Oceanography of the Celtic Sea I. Wind Drift},
  author={Leslie Hugh Norman Cooper},
  journal={Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom},
  year={1961},
  volume={41},
  pages={223 - 233}
}
  • L. Cooper
  • Published 1 June 1961
  • Environmental Science
  • Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
The dependence of prevailing wind drift in the Celtic sea upon prevailing winds is discussed and a proposal made to use wind records for the Scilly Meteorological Observatory for assessing drift currents for use in biological investigations. If there is no seasonal change in the direction of the prevailing winds, nevertheless, the wind drift in summer will be more northerly than in winter. The terms ‘current’, ‘residual water movement’ and ‘drift’, as used in this series of papers, are denned… 
4 Citations

The Oceanography of the Celtic Sea II. Conditions in the Spring of 1950

  • L. Cooper
  • Environmental Science
    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • 1961
The circulation of the northern and north-eastern Celtic Sea, has been studied, using especially observations made in April 1950, and a tentative explanation is offered for the distribution of compounds of phosphorus in terms of regeneration from bottom deposits.

Water movements and the distribution of Hydromedusae in British and adjacent waters

Abstract The waters around the British Isles and the North Sea are rich in species of Hydromedusae, particularly Anthomedusae and Leptomedusae. They are valuable as biological indicators of

The marine flora and fauna of the Isles of Scilly. The islands and their ecology

The range of ecological conditions on the shores is indicated by description of different levels of exposure from extreme shelter, with deposition of huge areas of relatively stable sand, to bare rock headlands facing the full rigour of the Atlantic weather.

The ecology of sublittoral communities at Abereiddy Quarry, Pembrokeshire

  • K. HiscockR. Hoare
  • Environmental Science
    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • 1975
Abereiddy Quarry is shown in Plate I. It lies at 51° 56′N, 5°13′W (Ordnance Survey Reference SM 795315), 6 km northeast of St Davids in Pembrokeshire (Text fig. 1). The quarry, a disused slate

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 28 REFERENCES

The Oceanography of the Celtic Sea II. Conditions in the Spring of 1950

  • L. Cooper
  • Environmental Science
    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • 1961
The circulation of the northern and north-eastern Celtic Sea, has been studied, using especially observations made in April 1950, and a tentative explanation is offered for the distribution of compounds of phosphorus in terms of regeneration from bottom deposits.

Cascading Over the Continental Slope of Water from the Celtic Sea

  • L. CooperDavid Vaux
  • Geology
    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • 1949
In the Celtic Sea, to the south of Ireland, water in some winters becomes sufficiently cooled and heavy to flow to the edge of the continental shelf and to run down the continental slope to a depth

Observations of the westerlies over the sea

Observations of wind speed and direction at 50 m intervals of height in the first few hundred metres have been made over the NE. Atlantic during 10 winter days of westerly winds. The following

Studies of water movements and winds at various lightvessels II. At the Seven Stones Lightvessel near the Scilly Isles

A review is given of the results obtained from upwards of 600 days of current measuring at the Seven Stones lightvessel during 1939–41. From the plotted observations, an attempt is made to deduce the

The Portuguese Man-of-War, Physalia Physalis L., in British and Adjacent Seas

  • D. P. Wilson
  • Environmental Science
    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • 1947
It is concluded that winds, rather than water movements, are the main factor in transporting the swarming swarms towards the British Isles and it is considered likely that the swarms come from the Azores-mid-Atlantic region rather than from the Canaries-Gibraltar district.

Exchanges of water between the English and Bristol Channels around Lands End

  • L. Cooper
  • Environmental Science
    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • 1960
This paper and the following one by Cooper, Lawford & Veley are attempts to achieve a better understanding of the exchanges of water around Lands End and in the neighbourhood of the Scilly Isles.

The aerodynamic drag of a free water surface

  • J. Francis
  • Environmental Science
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
  • 1951
The drag exerted by wind on a water surface has been measured in a tunnel 7·5 cm. wide and 7 m. long in which winds up to 14 m. /sec. can be made. The waves thus formed are similar to those seen at

Some theorems and procedures in shallow-water oceanography applied to the Celtic Sea

  • L. Cooper
  • Environmental Science
    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • 1960
Patterns of wind-induced currents Vortex lanes in the sea and plankton production, and the use of geopotential topographies in shallow water oceanography.

A contribution to the biology of Ianthina janthina (L.)

  • D. P. WilsonM. Wilson
  • Environmental Science, History
    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • 1956
The summer of 1954 will long be remembered for lack of sunshine, excess rain and frequent high winds over England and Wales. In the south-west of the region the winds from June onwards until the end

On the Value of Certain Plankton Animals as Indicators of Water Movements in the English Channel and North Sea

  • F. S. Russell
  • Environmental Science
    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • 1935
The possibility that certain plankton organisms retained by a stramin net may prove of value as indicators in elucidating the water movements at the mouth of the English Channel is shown. The water