The Obesity Paradox in Stroke: Lower Mortality and Lower Risk of Readmission for Recurrent Stroke in Obese Stroke Patients

@article{Andersen2015TheOP,
  title={The Obesity Paradox in Stroke: Lower Mortality and Lower Risk of Readmission for Recurrent Stroke in Obese Stroke Patients},
  author={Klaus K. Andersen and Tom Skyh{\o}j Olsen},
  journal={International Journal of Stroke},
  year={2015},
  volume={10},
  pages={104 - 99}
}
Background Although associated with excess mortality and morbidity, obesity is associated with lower mortality after stroke. The association between obesity and risk of recurrent stroke is unclear. Aims The study aims to investigate the association in stroke patients between body mass index and risk of death and readmission for recurrent stroke. Methods An administrative Danish quality-control registry designed to collect a predefined dataset on all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark 2000… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

Body mass index and stroke: overweight and obesity less often associated with stroke recurrence.
  • K. K. Andersen, T. Olsen
  • Medicine
    Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases : the official journal of National Stroke Association
  • 2013
Body mass index and clinical outcomes in patients after ischaemic stroke in South Korea: a retrospective cohort study
TLDR
Obesity is more likely to reduce mortality risk than normal weight, especially in elderly patients, and it was found that obesity had a protective effect on the all-cause mortality in the elderly.
Association between dynamic obesity and mortality in patients with first-ever ischemic stroke
TLDR
Overweight and abdominal obesity were paradoxically associated with reduced risk of mortality in patients who survived their first-ever ischemic stroke in China.
Association between dynamic obesity and mortality in patients with first-ever ischemic stroke: a hospital-based prospective study
TLDR
Overweight and abdominal obesity was paradoxically associated with reduced risk of mortality among first-ever ischaemic stroke survivors in China, and body weight management recommendations ought to not be based on mere projection from primary prevention of stroke.
The obesity paradox and survivors of ischemic stroke.
The obesity paradox in stroke: impact on mortality and short-term readmission.
Association of Body Mass Index and Risk of Stroke After Acute Minor Stroke or TIA: a Post Hoc Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial
TLDR
Being overweight was associated with an increased risk of recurrent stroke compared to being of normal weight in the authors' study, and no significant association was found between being overweight or obese and poor functional outcome or death.
Obesity and mortality after the first ischemic stroke: Is obesity paradox real?
TLDR
The obesity paradox in ischemic stroke patients is supported as shown by a significantly decreased hazard ratio for one-year mortality among overweight and obese patients in comparison to non-overweight patients.
Ischemic Stroke Mortality Is More Strongly Associated with Anemia on Admission Than with Underweight Status.
  • S. Kubo, N. Hosomi, M. Matsumoto
  • Medicine
    Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases : the official journal of National Stroke Association
  • 2017
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 35 REFERENCES
Body Mass Index and Poststroke Mortality
TLDR
Poststroke mortality is inversely related to BMI: overweight and obese stroke patients have a lower poststroke mortality rate than normal-weight and underweight patients.
Obesity and Recurrent Vascular Risk After a Recent Ischemic Stroke
Background and Purpose— Although obesity is an established risk factor for the occurrence of a primary stroke, little is known about the impact of baseline obesity on recurrent vascular risk among
Association Between Obesity and Mortality After Acute First-Ever Stroke: The Obesity–Stroke Paradox
TLDR
Based on BMI estimation, obese and overweight stroke patients have significantly better early and long-term survival rates compared to those with normal BMI.
Prospective Study of Body Mass Index and Risk of Stroke in Apparently Healthy Women
TLDR
In this large prospective cohort study among women, BMI was a strong risk factor for total and ischemic stroke but not for hemorrhagic stroke, and the association was highly mediated by hypertension, diabetes, and elevated cholesterol.
Readmission after stroke in a hospital-based registry
TLDR
Stroke survivors have high likelihood of readmission within 1 year following discharge, with infections and recurrent vascular events being the most common reasons.
Weight reduction for primary prevention of stroke in adults with overweight or obesity.
TLDR
This systematic review identified the urgent need for well-designed, adequately-powered, multi centre randomised controlled trials assessing the effects of weight reduction in persons with overweight or obesity on stroke occurrence.
Sex-Related Time-Dependent Variations in Post-Stroke Survival – Evidence of a Female Stroke Survival Advantage
TLDR
A female superiority in stroke survival competence is suggested, suggesting that women in that period are paying a ‘toll’ for their initial survival advantage.
Elevated body mass index and mortality risk in the elderly
  • I. Janssen, A. Mark
  • Medicine
    Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
  • 2007
TLDR
Calculations indicate that a BMI in the overweight range is not associated with a significantly increased risk of mortality in the elderly, while an elevated body mass index in the moderately obese range is onlyassociated with a modest increase in mortality risk.
...
...