The Nimbus 7 solar total irradiance: A new algorithm for its derivation

@article{Hoyt1992TheN7,
  title={The Nimbus 7 solar total irradiance: A new algorithm for its derivation},
  author={Douglas V. Hoyt and H. Lee Kyle and John R. Hickey and Robert H. Maschhoff},
  journal={Journal of Geophysical Research},
  year={1992},
  volume={97},
  pages={51-63}
}
The Nimbus 7 satellite has measured the solar total irradiance from November 1978 to July 1991 (153 months). These measurements are important both in solar physics and for climate change. To insure that the Nimbus 7 measurements are capturing the true behavior of the Sun, it is essential that the properties of the radiometer and its changes over time be understood. The calibration of the radiometer can be viewed as a process of removing instrumental influences from the raw measurements, leaving… 

On the variation of the Nimbus 7 total solar irradiance

For the interval December 1978 to April 1991, the value of the mean total solar irradiance, as measured by the Nimbus-7 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment channel 10C, was 1,372.02 Wm(exp -2), having

Solar Irradiance Variability Since 1978

Since November 1978 a set of total solar irradiance (TSI) measurements from space is available, yielding a time series of more than 25 years. Presently, there are three TSI composites available,

Variations in total solar irradiance during solar cycle 22

In this study, we have attempted to model the variations in total solar irradiance from two spacecraft. Specifically, we have modeled the Earth Radiation Budget on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft and the

Solar Total Irradiance: A Reference Value for Solar Minimum

Simultaneous solar total irradiance observations performed by absolute radiometers on board satellites during the quiet-Sun period between solar cycles 21 and 22 (1985–1987), are analyzed to

A comparison of solar total irradiance observations from spacecraft: 1985–1992

This paper presents a statistical comparison of the solar total irradiance measured from the Nimbus-7, the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), and the Upper

Uncertainty of total solar irradiance: an assessment of the last twenty years of space radiometry

A complete set of total solar irradiance measurements from space is available dating from November 1978, yielding a time series of more than twenty years. From measurements made by different space

Solar total irradiance observations from spacecraft: 1992–1993

A brief review of the simultaneous observations of solar total irradiance performed by the UARS ACRIM II (upper atmosphere research satellite active cavity radiometer irradiance monitor), EURECA SOVA

Revision of the PMOD Composite during Solar Cycle 21

Since November 1978 a set of total solar irradiance (TSI) measurements from space is available, yielding a time series of more than 25 years. Presently, there are three TSI composites available,

Observations of Irradiance Variations

Since November 1978 a complete set of total solar irradiance (TSI) measurements from space is available, yielding a time series of 21 years. From measurements made by different space radiometers (HF

A discussion of plausible solar irradiance variations, 1700-1992

From satellite observations the solar total irradiance is known to vary. Sunspot blocking, facular emission, and network emission are three identified causes for the variations. In this paper we
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 11 REFERENCES

An Alternative Derivation of the Nimbus 7 Total Solar Irradiance Variations

Nimbus 7 solar irradiance values have been made available to the scientific community through the open literature (e.g., Hickey et al., 1988) and through NASA data centers. A comparison of these

Total solar irradiance measurements by ERB/Nimbus-7. A review of nine years

The advent of reliable extraterrestrial solar irradiance measurements from satellites has supplied the impetus for new research in solar physics and solar-terrestrial relationships. The records for

Solar luminosity variations in solar cycle 21

The ACRIM I experiment (Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor) on the solar maximum Mission (SMM) satellite has provided a nearly continuous record of solar total irradiance variations since

The Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) experiment - An overview

The development of ERB observational systems is traced from its beginnings in the late 1950's through to the current ERB on the NIMBUS 7 satellite. The instruments comprising the current 22-channel

Long-Term Downward Trend in Total Solar Irradiance

The first 5 years of total solar irradiance observations by the first Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM I) experiment show a clearly defined downward trend, which appears to be due to unpredicted variations of solar luminosity on time scales of years, and it may be related to solar cycle magnetic activity.

The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE).

Abstract The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is the first multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. It will fly on a low-inclination NASA satellite and two

The nature of the short period fluctuations in solar irradiance received by the earth

An analysis of the periodicities found in the Nimbus-7 satellite measurements of solar irradiance (Solar Constant) indicates variations on three scales. Two of these variations are shown to be

The status of the Nimbus-7 earth-radiation-budget data set

The solar and the wide-field-of-view earth-flux channels are still recording high-quality data, but the narrow-field of-view scanner failed after 20 months, and plans for data-set improvement are discussed and a simple algorithm to improve the Widefield-Of-view data is presented.