The Nexus of Market Society, Liberal Preferences, and Democratic Peace: Interdisciplinary Theory and Evidence

@article{Mousseau2003TheNO,
  title={The Nexus of Market Society, Liberal Preferences, and Democratic Peace: Interdisciplinary Theory and Evidence},
  author={Michael Mousseau},
  journal={International Studies Quarterly},
  year={2003},
  volume={47},
  pages={483-510}
}
  • M. Mousseau
  • Published 1 December 2003
  • Economics, Political Science
  • International Studies Quarterly
Drawing on literature from Anthropology, Economics, Political Science and Sociology, an interdisciplinary theory is presented that links the rise of contractual forms of exchange within a society with the proliferation of liberal values, democratic legitimacy, and peace among democratic nations. The theory accommodates old facts and yields a large number of new and testable ones, including the fact that the peace among democracies is limited to market-oriented states, and that market… 

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