The New York Sleeping Eros: A Hellenistic Statue and Its Ancient Restoration

@inproceedings{Hemingway2017TheNY,
  title={The New York Sleeping Eros: A Hellenistic Statue and Its Ancient Restoration},
  author={S{\'e}an A. Hemingway and Richard E. Stone},
  year={2017}
}
The Bronze Statue of Sleeping Eros in the Metropolitan Museum has long been recognized as one of the finest bronze statues to survive from antiquity. It was first published by Gisela Richter as an original Hellenistic sculpture or very close replica dated between 250 and 150 B.C. Many subsequent scholars tend to agree with Richter’s assessment although not her precise dating. Others believe it to be a very fine Roman copy of one of the most popular sculptures ever made in Roman Imperial times… 
4 Citations

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