• Corpus ID: 82187508

The New World agaoninae (pollinators of figs)

@inproceedings{Wiebes1995TheNW,
  title={The New World agaoninae (pollinators of figs)},
  author={J. T. Wiebes and Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen},
  year={1995}
}
Non‐pollinating Fig Wasps Decrease Pollinator and Seed Production in Ficus andicola (Moraceae)
TLDR
It is found that Idarnes reduced pollinator production by almost half but did not reduce seed production, whereas Heterandrium reduced seed production by 40 percent, and marginally affected pollinators production.
A living fossil Tetrapus fig wasp (Hymenoptera: Agaoninae) developing in extant Neotropical fig species (Moraceae: Ficus, section Pharmacosycea).
TLDR
This work reports a group of New World extant Tetrapus morphotypes, whose females have two mandibular appendages and the males are hexapodous, their fig host association and phylogenetic position to the family Agaonidae, and suggests that Hexapus stands up as a living fossil and the sister clade of Tetrapu s.s.
Plant Sanctions And Pollinator Behaviour In The Fig Tree - Fig Wasp Mutualism
TLDR
Host sanctions and pollinator cheating in the fig tree – fig wasp mutualism suggest that mutualisms can show co-evolutionary dynamics analogous to those of “arms-races” in overtly antagonistic interactions, and sanctions are critical for long-term mutualism stability.
Genome‐wide sequence data show no evidence of hybridization and introgression among pollinator wasps associated with a community of Panamanian strangler figs
TLDR
The results suggest that while hybridization and introgression are processes operating within the host plants, these processes are relatively unimportant within their associated insect pollinators.
Fitness costs for fig wasps that fail to pollinate their host Ficus perforata
TLDR
It is shown experimentally that in Panamanian Ficus perforata there are fitness costs for wasps that do not pollinate, caused by a combination of abortions of unpollinated figs and reduced proportion of wasp larvae that successfully develop to adults.
Why mutualist partners vary in quality: mutation-selection balance and incentives to cheat in the fig tree-fig wasp mutualism.
TLDR
It is proposed that when discrimination is weak, uncooperative symbionts proliferate until they reach the equilibrium proportion that balances costs and benefits of cheating, and suggested that mechanisms that resolve the paradox of unco cooperative symbiont differ among host species.
Molecular analyses of Ficus erecta and its allies within the subsection Frutescentiae (Moraceae)
TLDR
There appears to be a consistent genetic background among these unresolved groups, which suggests that repeated hybridization (as a result of pollinator host shifts) has filled up the interspecific gaps during the fig–pollinator coevolution process.
Taxonomic revision and molecular phylogenetics of the Idarnes incertus species-group (Hymenoptera, Agaonidae, Sycophaginae)
TLDR
The Idarnes incertus species-group was reviewed and detailed morphological descriptions and illustrations for the species belonging to this group were provided to provide keys for the identification of the species as well as for recognising the different species-groups of Idarne and a closely related genus.
Fitness reduction for uncooperative fig wasps through reduced offspring size: a third component of host sanctions.
TLDR
It is determined that the size reduction of pollen-free offspring acts on the level of the entire fig fruit rather than on individual flowers, showing that estimates of the fitness effect of host sanctions on uncooperative symbionts should consider not only offspring quantity but also offspring quality.
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