The New Lifecycle of Women's Employment: Disappearing Humps, Sagging Middles, Expanding Tops

@article{Goldin2016TheNL,
  title={The New Lifecycle of Women's Employment: Disappearing Humps, Sagging Middles, Expanding Tops},
  author={C. Goldin and Joshua W. Mitchell},
  journal={Alfred P. Sloan: Working Longer (Topic)},
  year={2016}
}
A new lifecycle of women’s employment emerged with cohorts born in the 1950s. For prior cohorts, lifecycle employment had a hump shape; it increased from the twenties to the forties, hit a peak and then declined starting in the fifties. The new lifecycle of employment is initially high and flat, there is a dip in the middle and a phasing out that is more prolonged than for previous cohorts. The hump is gone, the middle is a bit sagging and the top has greatly expanded. We explore the increase… Expand
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