The Neuropsychiatric Aspects of Boxing

@article{Mendez1995TheNA,
  title={The Neuropsychiatric Aspects of Boxing},
  author={Mario F. Mendez},
  journal={The International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine},
  year={1995},
  volume={25},
  pages={249 - 262}
}
  • M. Mendez
  • Published 1 September 1995
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine
Objective: To review the neuropsychiatry of boxing. Method: This update considers the clinical, neuropsychological, diagnostic, neurobiological, and management aspects of boxing-related brain injury. Results: Professional boxers with multiple bouts and repeated head blows are prone to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Repeated head blows produce rotational acceleration of the brain, diffuse axonal injury, and other neuropathological features. CTE includes motor changes such as tremor… 
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Standard neuroimaging may show nonspecific atrophic changes; however, newer imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) show promise.
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Dementia Pugilistica (DP) is the initial term used to characterize a progressive cognitive deterioration, as result of multiple concussions, occurring in boxers, who have ended their professional
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The aim of this review is to compare clinical and pathological aspects of DP and CTE with a focus on disorders of movement.
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