The Neuronal Replicator Hypothesis

@article{Fernando2010TheNR,
  title={The Neuronal Replicator Hypothesis},
  author={Chrisantha Fernando and Richard A. Goldstein and E{\"o}rs Szathm{\'a}ry},
  journal={Neural Computation},
  year={2010},
  volume={22},
  pages={2809-2857}
}
We propose that replication (with mutation) of patterns of neuronal activity can occur within the brain using known neurophysiological processes. Thereby evolutionary algorithms implemented by neuro- nal circuits can play a role in cognition. Replication of structured neuronal representations is assumed in several cognitive architectures. Replicators overcome some limitations of selectionist models of neuronal search. Hebbian learning is combined with replication to structure exploration on the… 

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