The Neurodevelopmental Impact of Prenatal Infections at Different Times of Pregnancy: The Earlier the Worse?

@article{Meyer2007TheNI,
  title={The Neurodevelopmental Impact of Prenatal Infections at Different Times of Pregnancy: The Earlier the Worse?},
  author={Urs Meyer and Benjamin K Yee and Joram Feldon},
  journal={The Neuroscientist},
  year={2007},
  volume={13},
  pages={241 - 256}
}
Environmental insults taking place in early brain development may have long-lasting consequences for adult brain functioning. There is a large body of epidemiological data linking maternal infections during pregnancy to a higher incidence of psychiatric disorders with a presumed neurodevelopmental origin in the offspring, including schizophrenia and autism. Although specific gestational windows may be associated with a differing vulnerability to infection-mediated disturbances in normal brain… 
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