The Neurobiology of Postpartum Anxiety and Depression

@article{Pawluski2017TheNO,
  title={The Neurobiology of Postpartum Anxiety and Depression},
  author={Jodi L Pawluski and Joseph S. Lonstein and Alison S. Fleming},
  journal={Trends in Neurosciences},
  year={2017},
  volume={40},
  pages={106-120}
}
Ten to twenty percent of postpartum women experience anxiety or depressive disorders, which can have detrimental effects on the mother, child, and family. Little is known about the neural correlates of these affective disorders when they occur in mothers, but they do have unique neural profiles during the postpartum period compared with when they occur at other times in a woman's life. Given that the neural systems affected by postpartum anxiety and depression overlap and interact with the… Expand
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