The Neural Basis of Motor-Skill Learning

@article{Willingham1999TheNB,
  title={The Neural Basis of Motor-Skill Learning},
  author={Daniel B. Willingham},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={1999},
  volume={8},
  pages={178 - 182}
}
  • D. Willingham
  • Published 1 December 1999
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Current Directions in Psychological Science
Recent work indicates that motor-skill learning is supported by four processes: a strategic process that selects new goals of what to change in the environment, a perceptual-motor integration process that adjusts to new relationships between environmental stimuli and the appropriate motor response, a sequencing process that learns sequences of motor acts, and a dynamic process that learns new patterns of muscle activations. These four processes can operate in one of two modes: an unconscious… 

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