The Nesting Behavior of Dawson's Burrowing Bee, Amegilla dawsoni (Hymenoptera: Anthophorini), and the Production of Offspring of Different Sizes

@article{Alcock2004TheNB,
  title={The Nesting Behavior of Dawson's Burrowing Bee, Amegilla dawsoni (Hymenoptera: Anthophorini), and the Production of Offspring of Different Sizes},
  author={John Alcock},
  journal={Journal of Insect Behavior},
  year={2004},
  volume={12},
  pages={363-384}
}
  • J. Alcock
  • Published 2004
  • Biology
  • Journal of Insect Behavior
Females of Dawson's burrowing bees have a well-defined brood cell cycle involving cell construction, waxing, provisioning, egg laying, and cell capping. In one study population, nesting bees built smaller brood cells for offspring of lower weight and larger ones for heavier offspring, demonstrating their ability to anticipate the desired size of an offspring at the outset of a brood cell cycle. Furthermore, individual females varied the number of provisioning trips made per brood cell cycle by… Expand
Genetic breeding system and investment patterns within nests of Dawson's burrowing bee (Amegilla dawsoni) (Hymenoptera: Anthophorini)
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It is suggested that although minor males have low reproductive success, their production may nonetheless be beneficial in that minor males open up emergence tunnels for their larger and reproductively more valuable siblings. Expand
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Abstract.  1. Nesting females of Dawson's burrowing bees, Amegilla dawsoni, produce a large size class of offspring, which includes daughters and major sons, and a small size class, which consistsExpand
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