The Near-infrared Transmission Spectra of TRAPPIST-1 Planets b, c, d, e, f, and g and Stellar Contamination in Multi-epoch Transit Spectra

@article{Zhang2018TheNT,
  title={The Near-infrared Transmission Spectra of TRAPPIST-1 Planets b, c, d, e, f, and g and Stellar Contamination in Multi-epoch Transit Spectra},
  author={Zhanbo Zhang and Yifan Zhou and Benjamin V. Rackham and D{\'a}niel Apai},
  journal={The Astronomical Journal},
  year={2018}
}
The seven approximately Earth-sized transiting planets in the \object{TRAPPIST-1} system provide a unique opportunity to explore habitable zone and non-habitable zone small planets within the same system. Its habitable zone exoplanets -- due to their favorable transit depths -- are also worlds for which atmospheric transmission spectroscopy is within reach with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). We present here an independent reduction and analysis… 
The 0.8–4.5 μm Broadband Transmission Spectra of TRAPPIST-1 Planets
The TRAPPIST-1 planetary system represents an exceptional opportunity for the atmospheric characterization of temperate terrestrial exoplanets with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).
Ground-based follow-up observations of TRAPPIST-1 transits in the near-infrared
The TRAPPIST-1 planetary system is a favourable target for the atmospheric characterization of temperate earth-sized exoplanets by means of transmission spectroscopy with the forthcoming James Webb
Disentangling the Planet from the Star in Late-Type M Dwarfs: A Case Study of TRAPPIST-1g
The atmospheres of late M stars represent a significant challenge in the characterization of any transiting exoplanets due to the presence of strong molecular features in the stellar atmosphere.
The Transit Light Source Effect. II. The Impact of Stellar Heterogeneity on Transmission Spectra of Planets Orbiting Broadly Sun-like Stars
Transmission spectra probe exoplanetary atmospheres, but they can also be strongly affected by heterogeneities in host star photospheres through the transit light source effect. Here we build upon
Limits on Clouds and Hazes for the TRAPPIST-1 Planets
The TRAPPIST-1 planetary system is an excellent candidate for study of the evolution and habitability of M-dwarf planets. Transmission spectroscopy observations performed with the Hubble Space
ACCESS: An Optical Transmission Spectrum of the High-gravity Hot Jupiter HAT-P-23b
We present a new ground-based visible transmission spectrum of the high-gravity, hot Jupiter HAT-P-23b, obtained as part of the ACCESS project. We derive the spectrum from five transits observed
The Influence of Stellar Contamination on the Interpretation of Near-infrared Transmission Spectra of Sub-Neptune Worlds around M-dwarfs
The impact of unocculted stellar surface heterogeneities in the form of cool spots and hot faculae on the spectrum of a transiting planet has been a daunting problem for the characterization of
Analyzing Atmospheric Temperature Profiles and Spectra of M Dwarf Rocky Planets
The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will open up the possibility of comprehensively measuring the emission spectra of rocky exoplanets orbiting M dwarfs to detect and characterize their
A Hubble PanCET Study of HAT-P-11b: A Cloudy Neptune with a Low Atmospheric Metallicity
We present the first comprehensive look at the 0.35–5 μm transmission spectrum of the warm (~800 K) Neptune HAT-P-11b derived from 13 individual transits observed using the Hubble and Spitzer Space
A Review of Possible Planetary Atmospheres in the TRAPPIST-1 System
TLDR
It is shown that (i) Hubble Space Telescope transit observations, (ii) bulk density measurements comparison with H2-rich planets mass-radius relationships, (iii) atmospheric escape modelling, and (iv) gas accretion modelling altogether offer solid evidence against the presence of hydrogen-dominated—cloud-free and cloudy—atmospheres around TRAPPIST-1 planets.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 94 REFERENCES
INFRARED TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF THE EXOPLANETS HD 209458b AND XO-1b USING THE WIDE FIELD CAMERA-3 ON THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE
Exoplanetary transmission spectroscopy in the near-infrared using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) NICMOS is currently ambiguous because different observational groups claim different results from
A combined transmission spectrum of the Earth-sized exoplanets TRAPPIST-1 b and c
TLDR
Observations of the combined transmission spectrum of the two inner planets during their simultaneous transits on 4 May 2016 rule out cloud-free hydrogen-dominated atmospheres for each planet at ≥10σ levels; TRAPPIST-1 b and c are therefore unlikely to have an extended gas envelope as they occupy a region of parameter space in which high-altitude cloud/haze formation is not expected to be significant for hydrogen- dominated atmospheres.
Evidence for Atmospheric Cold-trap Processes in the Noninverted Emission Spectrum of Kepler-13Ab Using HST/WFC3
We observed two eclipses of the Kepler-13A planetary system, on UT 2014 April 28 and UT 2014 October 13, in the near-infrared using Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. By using the
Exoplanet Transit Spectroscopy Using WFC3: WASP-12 b, WASP-17 b, and WASP-19 b
We report an analysis of transit spectroscopy of the extrasolar planets WASP-12 b, WASP-17 b, and WASP-19 b using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We analyze the
THE EMERGENT 1.1-1.7 μm SPECTRUM OF THE EXOPLANET COROT-2B AS MEASURED USING THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE
We have used Hubble/WFC3 and the G141 grism to measure the secondary eclipse of the transiting, very hot Jupiter CoRoT-2b in the 1.1-1.7 μm spectral region. We find an eclipse depth averaged over
THE FLAT TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF THE SUPER-EARTH GJ1214b FROM WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 ON THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE
Capitalizing on the observational advantage oered by its tiny M dwarf host, we present HST/WFC3 grism measurements of the transmission spectrum of the super-Earth exoplanet GJ1214b. These are the rst
Updated Masses for the TRAPPIST-1 Planets
The newly detected TRAPPIST-1 system, with seven low-mass, roughly Earth-sized planets transiting a nearby ultra-cool dwarf, is one of the most important exoplanet discoveries to date. The short
Reconnaissance of the TRAPPIST-1 exoplanet system in the Lyman-α line
The TRAPPIST-1 system offers the opportunity to characterize terrestrial, potentially habitable planets orbiting a nearby ultracool dwarf star. We performed a four-orbit reconnaissance with the Space
Atmospheric reconnaissance of the habitable-zone Earth-sized planets orbiting TRAPPIST-1
Seven temperate Earth-sized exoplanets readily amenable for atmospheric studies transit the nearby ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 (refs 1,2). Their atmospheric regime is unknown and could range from
Seven temperate terrestrial planets around the nearby ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1
TLDR
The observations reveal that at least seven planets with sizes and masses similar to those of Earth revolve around TRAPPIST-1, and the six inner planets form a near-resonant chain, such that their orbital periods are near-ratios of small integers.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...