The Nazi Denaturalization of German Emigrants: The Case of Wilhelm Reich

@article{Bennett2014TheND,
  title={The Nazi Denaturalization of German Emigrants: The Case of Wilhelm Reich},
  author={Philip W. Bennett and Andreas Peglau},
  journal={German Studies Review},
  year={2014},
  volume={37},
  pages={41 - 60}
}
In 1933 the Nazis began to denaturalize German citizens who had fled Germany. The controversial Austrian psychoanalyst, Wilhelm Reich, was among the 40,000 emigrants who lost their German citizenship as a result of a denaturalization investigation—Reich had become German following the Anschluss. Shortly after he arrived in the United States, the FBI began a case against Reich, culminating in his arrest as a “German enemy alien,” and his imprisonment for nearly a month. The common features of… 
Wilhelm Reich's self‐censorship after his arrest as an enemy alien: The chilling effect of an illegal imprisonment
TLDR
Reich's withholding certain documents from publication was due to a self‐imposed censorship, motivated in part by the fear of further governmental interference with his life and work, but this fear did not extend to his discussion of his new theory of orgone energy.

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