The Naval Intelligence Handbooks: a monument in geographical writing

@article{Clout2003TheNI,
  title={The Naval Intelligence Handbooks: a monument in geographical writing},
  author={H. Clout and C. Gosme},
  journal={Progress in Human Geography},
  year={2003},
  volume={27},
  pages={153 - 173}
}
The Naval Intelligence Handbooks produced by British academics between 1941 and 1946 form the largest single body of geographical writing ever published. Two teams of authors based at Oxford and Cambridge completed 31 titles (58 volumes) before financial constraints required many titles to be cancelled. Speed and accuracy were absolutely essential in preparation of the Handbooks since lives might well depend on the quality of the information presented. This wartime experience served as a… Expand

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