• Corpus ID: 9015594

The Nature of Collective Resilience: Survivor Reactions to the 2005 London Bombings

@article{Drury2009TheNO,
  title={The Nature of Collective Resilience: Survivor Reactions to the 2005 London Bombings},
  author={John Drury and Christopher Cocking and Stephen D Reicher},
  journal={International journal of mass emergencies and disasters},
  year={2009},
  volume={27},
  pages={66-95}
}
Accounts from over 90 survivors and 56 witnesses of the 2005 London bombings were analysed to determine the relative prevalence of mass behaviors associated with either psychosocial vulnerability (e.g. `selfishness, mass panic) or collective resilience (e.g. help, unity). `Selfish behaviors were found to be rare; mutual helping was more common. There is evidence for (a) a perceived continued danger of death after the explosions; (b) a sense of unity amongst at least some survivors, arising from… 

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