The Nature and Mechanisms of Dental Fluorosis in Man

@article{Fejerskov1990TheNA,
  title={The Nature and Mechanisms of Dental Fluorosis in Man},
  author={Ole Fejerskov and F. Manji and Vibeke Baelum},
  journal={Journal of Dental Research},
  year={1990},
  volume={69},
  pages={692 - 700}
}
Any use of fluorides, whether systemic or topical, in caries prevention and treatment in children results in ingestion and absorption of fluoride into the blood circulation. The mineralization of teeth under formation may be affected so that dental fluorosis may occur. Dental fluorosis reflects an increasing porosity of the surface and subsurface enamel, causing the enamel to appear opaque. The clinical features represent a continuum of changes ranging from fine white opaque lines running… 
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Dental fluorosis (DF) affects the appearance and structure of tooth enamel and can occur following ingestion of excess fluoride during critical periods of amelogenesis. This tooth malformation may,
What additional precautions should I take when bonding to severely fluorotic teeth?
Background Restorative dentists and orthodontists have described severely fluorotic teeth as the most difficult surface for bonding.1,2 The difficulty arises from the composition of the enamel of
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