The Natural Evolutionary Relationships among Prokaryotes

@article{Gupta2000TheNE,
  title={The Natural Evolutionary Relationships among Prokaryotes},
  author={Radhey S Gupta},
  journal={Critical Reviews in Microbiology},
  year={2000},
  volume={26},
  pages={111 - 131}
}
  • R. Gupta
  • Published 2000
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Critical Reviews in Microbiology
Two contrasting and very different proposals have been put forward to account for the evolutionary relationships among prokaryotes. The currently widely accepted three domain proposal by Woese et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (1990) 87: 4576-4579) calls for the division of prokaryotes into two primary groups or domains, termed archaebacteria (Archaea) and eubacteria (Bacteria), both of which are suggested to have originated independently from a universal ancestor. However, this proposal… Expand
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