The NAACP, Black Power, and the African American Freedom Struggle, 1966–1969

@article{Hall2007TheNB,
  title={The NAACP, Black Power, and the African American Freedom Struggle, 1966–1969},
  author={Simon Hall},
  journal={The Historian},
  year={2007},
  volume={69},
  pages={49 - 82}
}
  • Simon Hall
  • Published 2007
  • Political Science
  • The Historian
INTRODUCTION On the evening of 17 June 1966, Stokely Carmichael, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), addressed a rally in Greenwood, Mississippi. The SNCC leader had been released from jail minutes before and acknowledged the “roar” of the angry crowd with a “raised arm and a clenched fist” as he moved forward to speak. “This is the 27 time I have been arrested— and I ain’t going to jail no more, I ain’t going to jail no more,” he told the several hundred mostly… Expand
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