The N-terminal Regulatory Domain of Cyclin A Contains Redundant Ubiquitination Targeting Sequences and Acceptor Sites

@article{Fung2005TheNR,
  title={The N-terminal Regulatory Domain of Cyclin A Contains Redundant Ubiquitination Targeting Sequences and Acceptor Sites},
  author={Tsz Kan Fung and Cain H. Yam and Randy Y C Poon},
  journal={Cell Cycle},
  year={2005},
  volume={4},
  pages={1411 - 1420}
}
Cyclin A is destroyed during mitosis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Like cyclin B, a destruction box (D-box) motif is required for the destruction of cyclin A. However, Cyclin A degradation is more complicated than cyclin B because cyclin A’s D-box motif is more extensive and proteolysis involves complex signaling in some organisms. In this study, we found that in addition to the D-box, the region between residues 123-157 also contributed to the ubiquitination and degradation of human… Expand
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