Corpus ID: 21863470

The Mythical Ghoul in Arabic Culture

@article{AlRawi2009TheMG,
  title={The Mythical Ghoul in Arabic Culture},
  author={Ahmed Al-Rawi},
  journal={Cultural Analysis},
  year={2009},
  volume={8},
  pages={45}
}
The Pre-Islamic Ghoul The earliest records of Arabs document their activities in Mesopotamia, providing evidence that the nomads of Arabia were always in direct contact with the more "advanced" people of Mesopotamia, mainly for the purpose of trade. This contact produced cultural exchange between the two peoples, mostly in terms of life style and borrowed words. In ancient Mesopotamia, there was a monster called 'Gallu' that could be regarded as one of the origins of the Arabic ghoul. (1) Gallu… Expand
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