The Mystery of Elasmosaurus platyurus Cope 1868 – Where is the Rest of the Type Specimen?

@article{Davidson2018TheMO,
  title={The Mystery of Elasmosaurus platyurus Cope 1868 – Where is the Rest of the Type Specimen?},
  author={J. Davidson and M. Everhart},
  journal={Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science},
  year={2018},
  volume={121},
  pages={335 - 345}
}
As originally described by Cope (1868), the type specimen of Elasmosaurus platyurus from western Kansas included more than 100 vertebrae, portions of the skull, and the reasonably complete pectoral and pelvic girdles of what was then the largest known plesiosaur. Within four years of its discovery, however, both of the limb girdles had disappeared with no official explanation. Here we document the events leading up to the loss of important portions of this unique specimen. 

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 19 REFERENCES
Captain Theophilus H. Turner and the Unlikely Discovery of Elasmosaurus Platyurus
  • M. Everhart
  • Biology
  • Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science
  • 2017
William E. Webb — Civil War Correspondent, Railroad Land Baron, Town Founder, Kansas Legislator, Adventurer, Fossil Collector, Author
  • M. Everhart
  • History
  • Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science
  • 2016
Revision of North American elasmosaurs from the Cretaceous of the Western Interior
  • Paludicola
  • 1959
The Paleozoic Museum in Central Park, or the Museum that Never Was
A review of the North American Cretaceous elasmosaurs
  • University of California Publications in Geological Sciences
  • 1952
Biographical Memoir of William More Gabb 1839 - 1878
  • National Academy of Sciences Biographical Memoirs . Volume VI
  • 1909
...
1
2
...