The More You Know : Information Effects on Job Application Rates by Gender in a Large Field Experiment ∗

@inproceedings{Gee2015TheMY,
  title={The More You Know : Information Effects on Job Application Rates by Gender in a Large Field Experiment ∗},
  author={Laura K. Gee},
  year={2015}
}
This paper presents the results from a 2.3 million person field experiment that varies whether a job seeker is shown the number of applicants for a job posting on a large job posting website, LinkedIn. This intervention increases the likelihood a person will start/finish an application by 0.6%-1.9%, representing an economically significant potential increase of over a thousand applications per day. This increase is greater for female applicants. Firms in industries that are highly represented… CONTINUE READING

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