The More Social Cues , The Less Trolling ? An Empirical Study of Online Commenting Behavior ∗

@inproceedings{Cho2013TheMS,
  title={The More Social Cues , The Less Trolling ? An Empirical Study of Online Commenting Behavior ∗},
  author={Daegon Cho and Alessandro Acquisti and Harold J. Heinz},
  year={2013}
}
We examine how online commenting is affected by different degrees of commenters’ identifiability: 1) real name accounts on social networking sites (or “real name-SNS accounts”; e.g., Facebook); 2) pseudonym accounts on social networking sites (or “pseudonym-SNS account”; e.g., Twitter); 3) pseudonymous accounts outside social networking sites (or “non-SNS accounts”; e.g., an online newspaper website’s account). We first construct a conceptual model of the relationship between the degree of… CONTINUE READING

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