The Monty Hall dilemma in pigeons: Effect of investment in initial choice

@article{Stagner2013TheMH,
  title={The Monty Hall dilemma in pigeons: Effect of investment in initial choice},
  author={Jessica P. Stagner and Rebecca M. Rayburn-Reeves and Thomas R. Zentall},
  journal={Psychonomic Bulletin \& Review},
  year={2013},
  volume={20},
  pages={997-1004}
}
In the Monty Hall dilemma, humans are initially given a choice among three alternatives, one of which has a hidden prize. After choosing, but before it is revealed whether they have won the prize, they are shown that one of the remaining alternatives does not have the prize. They are then asked whether they want to stay with their original choice or switch to the remaining alternative. Although switching results in obtaining the prize two thirds of the time, humans consistently fail to adopt… 
The Monty Hall dilemma with pigeons: No, you choose for me
TLDR
In the Monty Hall dilemma, humans are initially given a choice among three alternatives, one of which has a hidden prize, and subjects are shown that one of the remaining alternatives does not have the prize and asked to stay with their original choice or switch to the remaining alternative.
Further investigation of the Monty Hall Dilemma in pigeons and rats

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