The Metabolic Status of Some Late Cretaceous Dinosaurs

@article{Ruben1996TheMS,
  title={The Metabolic Status of Some Late Cretaceous Dinosaurs},
  author={John A. Ruben and Willem J. Hillenius and Nicholas R. Geist and Andrew R. Leitch and Terry D. Jones and Philip J. Currie and John R. Horner and George Espe},
  journal={Science},
  year={1996},
  volume={273},
  pages={1204 - 1207}
}
Analysis of the nasal region in fossils of three theropod dinosaurs (Nanotyrannus, Ornithomimus, and Dromaeosaurus) and one ornithischian dinosaur (Hypacrosaurus) showed that their metabolic rates were significantly lower than metabolic rates in modern birds and mammals. In extant endotherms and ectotherms, the cross-sectional area of the nasal passage scales approximately with increasing body mass M at M0.72. However, the cross-sectional area of nasal passages in endotherms is approximately… Expand
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