The Men’s Program: Does It Impact College Men’s Self-Reported Bystander Efficacy and Willingness to Intervene?

@article{LanghinrichsenRohling2011TheMP,
  title={The Men’s Program: Does It Impact College Men’s Self-Reported Bystander Efficacy and Willingness to Intervene?},
  author={Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling and John D. Foubert and Hope M. Brasfield and Brent D. Hill and Shannon Shelley-Tremblay},
  journal={Violence Against Women},
  year={2011},
  volume={17},
  pages={743 - 759}
}
This study considered whether a rape prevention program could reduce men’s rape myth acceptance, enhance the perceived effectiveness of college men’s bystander behavior, and increase men’s willingness to intervene as bystanders in potentially dangerous situations. As predicted, college men who experienced The Men’s Program significantly increased their self-reported willingness to help as a bystander and their perceived bystander efficacy in comparison to college men who experienced the… 

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